abstract

what a perfectly apt name for anything i try to dress in drag with words… here’s the pre- heavy research version of my thesis abstract:

Abstract

Space informs our lives. I endeavor to explore and offer space – the capacity to breathe into the confusing scary unbound places where we grow/evolve/emerge quite changed. I suggest that liminality, or experience of in-betweens and emptiness, venturing away from the familiar towards the unknown, is the only place where we actually learn and transform. Teachers and students, by the nature of their relationship, meet beyond comfort zones. Living and learning can be disorienting and frightening; deterred or rushed through mindlessly. Yet, lifelong learning is a never-ending creative process of letting go, changing, and becoming-again. Suicide ideation, self-harm, and queerness are intrapersonal territories from which “I” emerge, thus concepts of embodiment, queerness, space awareness, and death will be explored. I am developing yogic breathing practices, teacher workshops on embodied environment, and performance; observing and directly experiencing how space yields synchrony or distance between mind and body, self and other, life and death, here and there.

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12 Responses to “abstract”

  1. Sumi Says:

    Hi Elliott,

    This abstract is really solid to me — I immediately grasp what you’re saying, even though the concepts you’re conveying are hard to capture in words. You might explore using the word “liminal,” which is about the space in between stages or locations? Stylistically, I’ve heard that the present tense is preferred, so instead of “I will argue” we say “I argue.” I would also double check words you’ve broken into compounds: life-long is conventionally written without a dash, letting-go also does not need a dash. And as for the quotes around I, I would change that to “a sense of I” or “an identity emerges” so that you can take out the quote marks. Putting quote marks around an object creates a lot of questions for a reader because quote marks indicate the writer means “this thing but not this thing.”

    But these are extremely minor edits. On the whole, this abstract seems really good to me, clear, concise, and points the way to where your dissertation is going. Bravo/a!

    Much love,
    Sumi

  2. embodhiment Says:

    Ah, bowing in, Sumi~

    Thank you, for even venturing into this game at all 😉 This is a sort of pre- version, thus the “I will…” A few people have brought my attention to the concept/field of liminality… I have another section to write yah! Thank you so much for your shared wisdom. I will keep tweaking the abstract here in the blog, as insights and suggestions arrive. Your words make me love the inappropriate quotation marks even more. I will leave them as is for now. As that is it; precisely, I mean “‘this thing but not this thing.’” 🙂

    bowing, elliott

  3. embodhiment Says:

    –1st draft–

    Space informs our lives. I will argue that experiences of in-betweens and emptiness, venturing away from the familiar towards the unknown, are the only places where we actually learn and transform. Teachers and students, by the nature of their relationship, meet beyond comfort zones. Living and learning can be disorienting and frightening; deterred or rushed through mindlessly. Yet, life-long learning is a never-ending creative process of letting-go, changing, and becoming-again. I endeavor to experience and offer space – the capacity to breathe into the confusing scary unbound places where we grow/evolve/emerge quite changed. Self-harm, suicide ideation, and queerness are intrapersonal territories from which “I” emerge, thus concepts of embodiment, queerness, space awareness, and death will be explored. I am developing yogic breathing practices, teacher workshops on embodied environment, and performance; observing and directly experiencing how space yields synchrony or distance between mind and body, self and other, life and death, here and there.

  4. Vanessa Says:

    I *love* it! Very well articulated. I can’t wait to read more!! Any chance you can bring some of those workshops out here to the PI? 🙂

  5. Luke Says:

    Looks great to me, I think the ideas are all definitely related, though I understand the difficulty in putting that into words! Like V said, can’t wait to read more!

  6. Melanie Says:

    Yes. I am not, nor have I ever been, a graduate student, so I have never had to really roll around in the world of graduate theses. That said, your first draft really encapsulates a cohesive proposition for what you intend to explore. And it is proposed in such a way that any ole’ schmoe (like me, for instance) can grasp it. I say, “hooray!”

    • embodhiment Says:

      yahoo! – and – wait – do you mean that the 1st draft, down here in the comments, is then clearer than the altered post? i wanna definitely make this thing as approachable as possible. ehem, wish me luck…

  7. jenny, jj,jiji,me Says:

    the space between, my friend, the space between. i started with synapses–“observing and directly experiencing how space yields synchrony or distance between mind and body, self and other, life and death, here and there.”

    thank you for your wordwork. macro to micro and fromthebacktothemiddleandaroundagain.

  8. further elaborations of a tube « embodhiment Says:

    […] are the latest brushstroke practices in response to an aspect of my research on inner/outer space and learning and living […]

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